Review: Daughter of the Pirate King

image1 (7)Title: Daughter of the Pirate King

Author: Trisha Levenseller

Series: Daughter of the Pirate King, #1

Genre: Fantasy, Adventure, YA, Fiction

Publication Date: February 28, 2017

Rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️✨ (3.5 stars)


There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.

Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.

More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King.


Daughter of the Pirate King is a quick, cute, and fun guilty pleasure novel that kept me entertained from start to finish.

Growing up with the relentless ruler of the seas as her father, Alosa understands what it means to be powerful and feared. The Pirate King taught her everything she knows, and it’s why he trusts her alone to carry out a daring and dangerous mission: infiltrating another pirate ship under the guise of capture in order to steal a valuable artifact. Alosa thinks the hardest part is going to be staying locked up as she plays her part as the unwilling prisoner, but even she can’t help the unfair attraction that she starts to feel toward her enigmatic captor, Riden, and neither of them can predict the storms that are growing on the horizon.

I was charmed from page one. Alosa is a quick-thinking, resourceful heroine who can more than hold her own in both physical and verbal sparring. It was a joy to watch her engage in battles of the wits with her captors, often coming out on top almost effortlessly with her sharp tongue or hidden strengths. I didn’t much care for the narrative tendency of listing and explaining her own character traits, which often rang flat and too cocky, but I was always amused when she backed her claims with action.

Alosa and Riden were both such strong characters, and I wanted to love the attraction blooming between them, but it felt much more rushed than natural. It was hard to find satisfaction in their inevitable connection, since they’d been wavering right on the edge of it from more or less first glance. There were also plenty of apparent betrayals that warranted discussion but instead seemed to get swept under the rug, which was frustrating. Nevertheless, I loved their fierce protectiveness of one another and their ability to get under each other’s skin in a way that no one else ever could.

And lastly, oh, that twist! I loved the additional dimension that it brought into the storyline, but I really do wish there had been some more clues dropped or even just asides that would make sense in hindsight. For a fantasy novel, there could have been a lot more world building woven throughout the book from the start, and my fingers are crossed that the followup will expand on the mythology.

Despite my gripes, I really did find this to be a thoroughly entertaining read. The action was fantastic, and Alosa was such a sassy and powerful protagonist. I can’t wait to get my hands on the sequel, Daughter of the Siren Queen, which was released today!

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Author: Kaila

My name is Kaila, and I'm a bibliophile with a love of traveling and adventure. When I'm not buried in a book - preferably mysteries, thrillers, and fantasies - you'll find me at work as a software engineer or training as an amateur Muay Thai fighter ... no dull moments here!

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